IMRIC and You

Follow the news and meet the people behind IMRIC's innovative medical research.

A Modern Day Hero: Rick Hansen Comes to Town

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

Rick Hansen



One of the most exciting things in life is to meet a real modern-day hero. For me that hero is Rick Hansen.

Rick Hansen was born and raised in British Columbia. As a teenager he not only played sports but was clearly one of the top athletes winning award after award. Then at the age of fifteen Hansen and his friend were thrown out of the bed of truck on the way back from a day of fishing. His injuries would change his life forever. Damaging his spinal cord, Hansen became a paraplegic and the results were the end of his athletic career. Or so his friends and family thought.

Although Hansen was now handicapped from the waist down, after returning from rehabilitation he was encouraged by his former volley ball coach to continue playing sports. And in Hansen fashion he proved that he was still the same sporty guy. The sports may be a little different, but Hansen went on to collect many more awards. He was the first student to graduate in physical education from the University of British Columbia. And from there he became a world class champion wheelchair marathoner and paralympic athlete (He won 19 international wheelchair marathons, the world title 4 times, 9 gold medals at the 1982 Pan American Wheelchair Games, and represented Canada at the 1984 Olympics). His passion for sports did not end with his injury, but instead shifted course. Perhaps Hansen wasn't playing basketball and volleyball on two feet, but he went on to coach high school kids and stayed in the game.

You're Never Too Young For A Scientific Breakthrough!

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

Jack Andraka

A few weeks ago I wrote about Professor Citri who recently created ArtLit, a device that will enable direct identification and profiling of drug resistant bacterial infections— at age 91.

Well if two weeks ago I thought you're never too old to have a scientific breakthrough, I'm now going to say you're also never too young.

Still in high school, fifteen-year-old Jack Andraka has just advanced cancer research, you know in his play time after school. He is the winner of the world's largest high school science research competition, the Intel Int'l Science and Engineering Fair, for developing a blood and urine test for pancreatic cancer. What’s unique about his test is it is cheaper and faster than the current test and 100 times more sensitive. 

Minister of Health Michael de Jong experiences IMRIC first-hand

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

Minister of Health (BC) Michael de Jong

This week Michael de Jon, Minister of Health in British Columbia, visited Israel and spent time at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC). I had the pleasure of meeting him and hearing what he thought about the institute, research and people.  Check out this video clip and hear what he had to say. 

You're Never Too Old For A Scientific Breakthrough!

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

In today's world what does retirement really mean? Well for retired IMRIC Professor Nathan Citri it doesn't mean to quit your day job. On the contrary, Professor Citri has just developed ArtLit, a method and device to enable direct identification and profiling of drug resistant bacterial infections.

Sure he has been retired for over twenty years, but at 91-years-old he hasn't seemed to slow down one bit. The breakthrough device will help provide instant guidelines for patients' appropriate treatment in hospitals, a radical innovation that will save lives and cut down on hospital visits.

Parenting: There is no science is there?

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

Raising a well-rounded child

If you don't know this already, raising a child is hard work. Forget the physical pain of holding your kid, wearing those carriers, strollers up and down stairs, or running after them when they learn how to walk; beyond all that there is the fact that you have to actually raise this little human being to develop and be a successful adult in the real world one day.

There is no precise science about how to raise your child, but there are plenty of experts and books out there promising to guide your child to Harvard if you just do as they say. Well, I'm a new mother with a child that is finally at that age where you can see the twinkle in his eye when he understands you. When he understands you but does what he wants to anyways. Yes, my son gets it.

And now that he can really understand me I am beginning to worry about how to raise him. You know, what are the best toys, what books should we be reading him, or should he be reading (that's ridiculous he's just a baby)? There are so many questions; often they become an overwhelming mess of anxiety which is neither good for the parent or the child.

Today my friend posted a great article on Facebook that eased some of my concerns. The article focuses on some tips to raise a well-rounded kid.