IMRIC and You

Follow the news and meet the people behind IMRIC's innovative medical research.

The Personal Side of Parkinson's

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

Parkinson's Humor

It seems as though I read about a new advancement in curing Parkinson’s disease on a weekly basis. The news is both exciting and promising for the thousands of people that live with the disease.  This week I read about the personal side of Parkinson’s in a guest blog post on the Michael J. Fox  Foundation website.

The post, written by Bev Ribaudo, shares her story about finding out if she is a candidate for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). Ribaudo was diagnosed with Parkinson’s at 47 years old, but began showing signs of the disease in her late 30’s.  Today she takes her required medication and through humor finds an outlet to share her journey with the world.After reading this first blog post, I continued to learn about her and her husband (devoted and loving) and laughed as I scrolled through the stories. Her humor may not cure the disease but it is certainly helping her and many others to cope with it.

I wanted to share her story with all of you in order to bring a little laughter and even hope into your day. And for those dealing with the serious side of the disease I wanted to remind you how here at IMRIC we recently had an incredible breakthrough in the fight for a cure.

Prof. Hagai Bergman and MD-PhD student Boris Rosin have hopefully improved DBS by using real-time adaptive stimulation, which disrupts the pathological neuronal activity associated with Parkinson’s disease instead of delivering constant stimulus. The IMRIC lab showed that this adaptive disruption, which the researchers term closed-loop deep brain stimulation, is much more efficient than the constant electrical current stimulation being used in DBS today.

To read more about the discovery click here.

To read more of Bev Ribaudo's blog click here

Olympics Means New Workout Goals!

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

London 2012 Olympics



With the Olympics in full gear it is hard not to get into it. But somehow watching the competition becomes more of a competitive sport between me and my workout goals than just rooting for the gold.

Watching these incredibly fit athletes makes me want to get into shape too.  I say this from the comfort of my couch as I throw the popcorn (fat free, I might add) in the air and cheer on these athletic gods.  But this year as  I watch the games I have decided to not envy the winners' body fat, and instead increase my own fitness goals.

We may not all be Olympic athletes but we can still challenge our bodies with new fitness goals everyday. Today I decided to end my usual run with a sprint. Sure it was hard, but I visualized the Olympic race I recently watched and said, me too. I can do this.

It is important to always remember that while the researchers are doing their best to find cures and heal the world one breakthrough at a time, that it is also our responsibility to keep in shape. We must try to be healthy. So whether that means a brisk morning walk, a local race or finally using the gym membership; get out there and be the Olympic Athlete that you can be.

Here are some great quotes from Olympic Athlete to get you going:

Quotes originally appear here.

"Not everybody wants to do as much training as an Olympian but EVERYONE is capable of getting fitter and achieving in sport!" says Debbie Flood.

Debbie is part of the Great Britain Olympic rowing team and won silver in the quadruple scull in the Beijing Olympics.

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Jessica Ennis, World heptathlon champion, is the poster-girl of the 2012 Olympics.

"To be truly fit, training has to be progressive," says Ennis' coach Toni Minichiello. "Doing the same training day in day will not make any progress towards your intended goal. Regular, yet different, training and exercise is important. Training and fitness has to become a habit, a lifetime habit, but all habits can be fun."

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Jenny Meadows is the European and World medal-winning 800m athlete.

Warming up is essential before your training session. "If you don't warm up, you're more likely to injure yourself," says Meadows. Meadows' own warm-ups consist of slow, low-intensity movements in which she gradually increases the rhythm and the intensity of the stretches.  She spends about half an hour warming up before a training session. "A warm-up also helps you to feel energized and focus on your training," adds Jenny.

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Tim Brabants combines a busy life as a doctor with a spectacular gold medal-winning career as a sprint kayaker.

"Firstly set your goals for what you are trying to achieve, however simple that may be. Working towards a specific goal always makes training feel more worthwhile, plus you get a sense of achievement when you realize that goal," Brabants says. "From then, try to stick to a routine of training that has enough variety in it to keep you motivated and challenges different parts/systems of your body.

"The third key aspect is preparation. I always pack my training kit and recovery food/drinks etc the night before so I don't forget anything and feel ready to go in the mornings."

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Jo Jackson is an Olympic bronze medalist and world record holder in the 400m freestyle.

"It can be difficult to motivate yourself if you're working out alone all the time, so try exercising with friends. That way you can motivate each other. Join a club; it's really good for you and can help improve your times and distances. Exercise is a really healthy part of your lifestyle so it's important to make it a regular routine."

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Gymnast Louis Smith has been junior European Champion and Commonwealth champion, as well as winning bronze in the 2008 Olympics on the pommel horse.

"My mental approach to my sport has played a huge part in my success," says Smith. "You have to approach the challenges you set yourself with a positive attitude and a belief in your abilities, otherwise it makes it difficult to achieve your goals. I believe in my abilities and that's what has got me to where I am today."



 

Your Research is a Big Deal!

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

protein replacement therapy

Science is a lot of work. And I say that as someone who didn't do well at it in high school, and was not required to study it at my liberal arts college. While, I breathe a sigh of relief, I also inhale gratitude for those that can do it, and do it well.

When I "hangout" at the IMRIC campus I am a wallflower. I sit outside during a break between classes and watch students and professors discuss their research with as much excitement as I would feel talking about the latest big hit comedy. They are so involved in their conversation they are barely taking sips of their coffee, which I assume they will need since they spend all day in the labs.

When I interview the researchers I can hear their passion for their work and the exhaust of the daily routine in long hours of investigations that can take up to years at a time. The professors conduct research, write articles and teach university courses, and still somehow find time to sit with me and discuss all that, every now and then.

What is so incredible to me is when they talk about their current research and vaguely mention the recent award that they received for their work. The sentence is thrown in as an afterthought in between scientific words that makes my brain have to work much harder.

Innovative Methods: Twist Out Cancer

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

Jenna, cancer survivor

I was recently at a conference and met a woman with a super cool haircut. The kind of cut that makes you forget to introduce yourself and rather just go right up to a person and say, "wow I love your hair." At the time that I met her (or at least complimented her), I didn't know that this person is a cancer survivor.

Jenna Benn, the girl with awesome hair, is a lymphoma survivor and an innovator. Jenna took her cancer and did something with it. As Jenna says, "with virtually no statistics and no research I was really left to sort of create my own story." After she finished her treatment she decided she wanted to give back.

Jenna wanted people to join her on the dance floor and twist our cancer. She wanted people to literally put on their dancing shoes and twist. The response was incredible, with hundreds of videos of people twisting in support. Jenna had not only created a story, she connected those dealing with cancer, survivors, friends and family, in what can be a very isolating experience.

My Breakthrough: Finally Meeting Rick Hansen

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

Rick Hansen

It finally happened. I met Rick Hansen during his trip to Israel where he received an Honorary Doctorate from The Hebrew University. You know that I was excited to meet such an incredible person.

And apparently I was not the only person that was looking forward to meeting him. As we began to film our interview Hansen was bombarded by person after person that wanted the chance to speak with him too. The best part was watching how Hansen engaged everyone. When he speaks he makes eye contact and he is actually really looking at you. At one point I even asked him how he stays so humble. Of course he responded in the most humble fashion saying he that he simply appreciates what he has.

It was a pleasure to meet this modern day hero. Check out this short clip of Hansen receiving his doctorate and his speech. And of course the clip that I filmed. The Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) is already looking forward to seeing you again soon as well as the continued spinal cord research collaboration.