IMRIC and You

Follow the news and meet the people behind IMRIC's innovative medical research.

Movember Moustache is Growing Your Way

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

moustache for Movember

It’s another Movember and that means less space on people’s faces and more moustaches. This year takes no exception to growing out that full-length moustache to raise funds and awareness for Men’s Health.

This year more celebrities, colleges and organizations have gotten on the moustache train and are not only growing them but finding the most unique way to spread the word about this critical month. In an effort to do our part here at IMRIC, not only through our incredible prostate research, we would like to share some of the incredible moustaches, campaigns and commercials promoting the Movember cause. Have a laugh, learn about men’s health and join in with your own hair growth!

Check out this hilarious video from Parks and Recs star Nick Offerman on the in-between stage of moustache length.

 

The European Research Council Grants Announced: Six IMRIC Researchers Receive the Prize!

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

ERC logo

 

The IMRIC campus is buzzing with good news as word spreads that six IMRIC researchers have won the prestigious European Research Council (ERC) grants. The grants represent a wide variety of research fields throughout the institution and will support breakthrough research for the next few years to come.

The recipients of the award include Prof. Hagai Bergman, Prof. Ora Fruman, Prof. Eli Keshet, Prof. Ofer Mandelboim, Prof. Hanah Margalit and Prof. Amir Amedi. Their labs will each enjoy the fruits of their labor as they continue in their basic science investigations that will change medicine, as we know it.

Prof. Ofer Mandelboim’s research on bacteria and Natural Killer (NK) cells will possibly introduce a new field of research throughout the next few years of study. As he explains, “NK cells that are well known by their ability to recognize and eliminate viruses and tumor cells were also implicated in the defense against bacteria. However, that said, the recognition of viruses and tumors by NK cells is intensively studied but little is understood when it comes to the recognition of bacteria by NK cells. Moreover, we do not know how bacteria is recognized and the functional consequences of such recognition are also weakly understood.” His goal is to aim at answering these questions and to determine the “NK cell receptor-bacterial interactome.”

Prof. Hagai Bergman will continue his research and implementation of closed-loop Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy on mental disorders. This fascinating work has already made headway in the medical world for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s. Prof. Bergman told me that he could not have done it without the “amazing students” in his lab that are the ones pushing him and his research forward. To check out a recent vlog from his PhD student Boris Rosin click here. Prof. Bergman will continue to focus his investigations in understanding the effective treatment for Basal Ganglia and their disorders.

Prof. Amir Amedi’s research of brain organization to visual rehabilitation is another unique investigation changing the face of blindness, as we know it today. Through his work in sensory substitution, Prof. Amedi has shown the world that you can see through sound. Today, Amedi’s lab is working on the concept of ‘seeing’ with your ears, hands and bionic eyes. To learn more about his lab’s work check out Graduate student Ella’s recent vlog in which she demonstrates the sensory substitution method and even shares an example for viewers to test themselves.

Are you a mindful eater?

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

chocolate

I eat chocolate a lot. Don’t most people? But until a recent food workshop I hadn’t actually tasted chocolate in a long time. Does that make sense? Because it is true. In today’s world it seems like we are always eating on the go or just being a couch potato and eating without awareness.

We are not alone. This past weekend I took part in a mindful eating workshop and learned how to eat food again. As explained to us, somewhere along the way we have picked up our bad eating habits. Often these habits are reflected in our other daily activities. I am the type of person that rushes from place to place, event-to-event, and just like my schedule, I squeeze food in and shove it down.

My poor food habits don’t stop there. I also eat with awareness. I will watch TV and snack on a bag of chips until it is empty. Or I finish my whole plate of food even if I was full half way through. In fact a recent study on French and American eating showed I am not the only one. When French people were asked how they know they are done eating they said when they feel full. When Americans were asked the same question they answered that when others around them have finished eating their meals.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

October Breast Cancer Awareness Month

In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month I would like to share a special blog post from Breastcancer.org. To learn more about breast cancer screening click here. Check out IMRIC's latest breast cancer research here

________________________________________________________________________________

Breastcancer.org is proud to present the work of Charlotte Matthews. Charlotte is a poet and professor and mother of two children, Emma (13) and Garland (10). Following is her poem, “Consider It Solved.”

Consider It Solved

 

 

 

 

When I set fire to the backyard

last week, I didn’t mean to.

I’d only wanted to burn up

the notebook that came with diagnosis.

I was having myself a kind of

five-year-out celebration, erasing

the odds heaped against me.

And it started out so well:

bundled smoke, tight stack

A Phone with a medical twist

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

LifeWatch

Technology is a force connecting us together. What once was a letter in the mail taking weeks to arrive is now an email received almost as quickly as your finger hits the send button. Messages are no loner sent by wire; instead, they are typed and delivered via cell phone. And along with the method, the physical technology has made leaps and bounds over the last few years.

Phones get smaller and smaller and smarter and smarter. The idea of connection is never more present than in the smartphone technology, which is home to your phone book, calendar, internet, camera and of course your games. And, there is a new connection that the Israeli company LifeWatch Technologies has added to that list, your health.

The company recently introduced the LifeWatch V Android-based phone. This device, the first of its kind will measure blood glucose levels, oxygen saturation, stress levels, heart rate, body temperature, and also chart diets, medication reminders and even measure daily activity through embedded sensors. Data and results are provided to the user and to third parties such as healthcare providers or caretakers, via email or text message.

The gadget can monitor simple everyday life necessities like taking vitamins, measuring footsteps or logging workouts, to the more critical health tasks of managing chronic conditions like diabetes. It will of course also be an amazing tool for parents to monitor their children on a daily basis, keeping up with their immunizations and any necessary tests they may need. The phone may even be developed to help those unable to communicate with a special speech component.



The device is designed to be user friendly for any age and is set to be on the market by next year. A phone that also functions as a medical device will change healthcare, as we know it.