IMRIC and You

Follow the news and meet the people behind IMRIC's innovative medical research.

Dying of Dementia

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

Degenerative Diseases

Over the last few years I watched my friend struggle to take care of her mother who was diagnosed with dementia. Although she was busy raising her new baby, she had decided to take care of her mother as well, moving her closer to her home.

At times it seemed the baby was easier to take care of than her mother. After all, emotionally this was the woman who raised her, and now after many years, she the daughter began to take full control. And as her family grew from one baby to two, her mother’s memory loss grew too. Simple conversations became difficult. Time needed to be better managed. Emotions contained.

I watched from the outside, never saying anything. But it did remind me of my grandmother who too suffered from dementia. It brought me back to a conversation I had with her once over the phone when I was seven, which would end up being a few years before she died. She kept confusing me with my brother, repeating everything she said. I thought, at the time, she was being silly, but later my parents explained to me what was really going on.

Many years have passed since my grandmother died. My friend’s mother died this week. The sad stories have similarities since the disease takes over your mind. Dementia can affect basic functioning making the easiest of activities hard. I know there were days where my uncle said my grandmother lost things, or she refused to leave the house, but couldn’t be left alone. I don’t know what it was like for my friend, but I can only imagine.

Dementia affects us all. We all know someone or a story about it. I know the emotional side and the personal experience. I also know the scientific side working on breakthroughs and hopefully a cure for degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and many others. While I have the memory of my grandmother’s last difficult years, I also have the experience of meeting with IMRIC researchers and their students as their investigations show true progress in the race for a cure.

I know that while my friend deals with her loss, the scientists are gaining more and more knowledge through their innovative research to hopefully give our stories a happier ending. 

To learn more about IMRIC research click here.

 

 

Partner Up!

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

Breakthrough science in the making

It is always fun to share good news. And what could be better than a new partnership that will eventually lead to even more innovative science and medical breakthroughs. Last week it was announced that The Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, representing 97 universities, will join forces to, “work together in order to facilitate, promote and support international research collaboration between Israeli and Canadian universities.”

The signing of the agreement took place during a mission to Israel co-hosted by the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Center for Israel and Jewish Affairs. The delegation was made up of Canadian university presidents, including from Simon Fraser University, University of Calgary, University of Saskatchewan, Queen’s University, Concordia University, and St. Francis Xavier University.

Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, IMRIC, we have already had incredibly fruitful collaborations, giving both sides of the world, unique opportunities and dynamic virtual labs in our quest for answers and cures in some of the most prevalent diseases facing us today.

I can’t wait to report on more amazing research that is bound to come! For now check out the others who are also excited for the new relationship!

AUCC Vice-President Christine Tausig Ford said: “Canada and Israel share a common commitment to educational attainment and research excellence, and are among the best in the world in these important indicators of global leadership. Increased collaboration with universities in Israel will strengthen the research and teaching missions of Canada’s universities and benefit both countries’ economies.”

For more on IMRIC collaborations click here

Meet The Next Einstein Winner: Charles Rose

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

Searching for the Next Einstein

Check out this video of Charles Rose's speech in which he discusses his 'Searching for the Next Einstein' winning idea. While in Israel Charles shared the concept  of using dragonflies to eradicate global warming and his love for science, and still made sure to get in vacation time and tour the most popular site's the Holy Land has to offer.

To read his winning idea submission click here

A TV Show That Shakes Things Up: Starring Parkinson's

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

Michael J. Fox is once again bringing his star power to the Parkinson’s community and raising awareness in a most unique way. With TV shows ranging from the strangest of reality to every kind of criminal activity out there, it’s time to change it up and throw Parkinson’s into the mix.

And who better to have a TV show with a character dealing with Parkinson’s disease than Michael J. Fox. Diagnosed with the disease in 1991, Fox went public with his condition in 1999. In the year 2000 he semi-retired from acting due to the severity of the disease; however, the beloved actor is finally making his comeback in a new television show, which mirrors his own life and struggles with the disease.

The sitcom,"The Michael J. Fox Show,” is about a news anchor, Mike Henry, who decides to return to television, despite his continuing struggle with Parkinson's disease. Like Fox himself, its eponymous star is a adored Hollywood actor, who has decided to return to television, despite his fight with Parkinson's disease. NBC won a bidding war to produce the series, and has committed to make 22 episodes before the pilot is even broadcast in the autumn.

Fox wants to make it clear that he is not making fun of the disease or himself, but rather he is, “just showing a guy who looks at life with humor," he explains in a tweet.  In an interview with AdWeek Fox discusses the storyline for the show as being roughly based on stories from his books. “We cast children that are roughly the same age of my own kids, so a lot of the experiences and interactions are the same. Although they’re not so much alike that my real kids are going to think that every time one of the kids on the show does something goofy it’s a reflection on them,” he says.

Check out the show’s preview below and get ready for an personal education in Parkinson’s.

Check out IMRIC's breakthrough Parkinson's research.

To Learn more about Michael J. Fox's Foundation for Parkinson's click here.

Mother's Day Blog: Advice, Humor and More

By:

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone

Molly Livingstone never did well at science, but that hasn’t stopped her from appreciating it. Here at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) she is able to witness first-hand, the innovative breakthroughs changing the face of medicine, on a daily basis. Living in Israel, Molly has the opportunity of visiting the IMRIC labs, talking with the students and faculty about their latest research, and getting to know the people behind these great minds.

mother's day

As a mother, using google is the same as adding a bit of salt to my cooking--it has become a necessity of life. I love searching for tips, advice, recipes and stories online to feel connected to a global community of mothers. This Mother's Day I would like to share a few blogs as resources that I often use on a daily basis. If you know of other useful blogs please share them with us here. Enjoy your day mothers, we all know you deserve it!